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Summary: The 2017 Global Human Capital Report released by the World Economic Forum on Wednesday13th September 2017 ranked Rwanda 71st globally and first in Africa with a score of 61.06%. Rwanda’s highest performance was seen in the “deployment subindex” where it ranked second globally with a score of 90.1%. Within this subindex, the report assessed four indicators which include: Labour force participation rate, employment gender gap, unemployment rate and underemployment rate. 
 
Notes:  
  • The Global Human Capital Index 2017 ranked 130 countries on how well they are developing their human capital on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best) across four thematic dimensions —capacity, deployment, development and know-how— and five distinct age groups or generations— 0–14 years; 15–24 years; 25–54 years; 55–64 years; and 65 years and over— to capture the full human capital potential profile of a country
  • This report aims to provide a holistic assessment of a country’s human capital—both current and expected—across its population. 
  • It defines “human capital” as the knowledge and skills people possess that enable them to create value in the global economic system. 
Highlights on Rwanda’s performance:
  • Rwanda ranked 71st globally and first in Africa followed by
    Ghana (72), Cameroon (73) and
    Mauritius (74). These countries have developed more than 60% of their

    human capital. (See Table 2- Page 9) 

  • Rwanda (71) and Ghana (72), owe their comparatively strong performance to, respectively, almost completely closed education and employment gender gaps and significantly improved educational attainment of the country’s younger generations. (Page 15) 
  • Rwanda, Kenya and Ghana benefit from the stock of know-how embodied in large medium-skilled employment sectors and comparatively strong education quality and staff training, laying the foundation for building their future human capital potential. (Page 15) 
  • However, all three countries still have room for further improvement in their secondary education enrollment rates, ensuring this progress is shared as broadly as possible across their populations. (Page 15) 
  • Out of the 17 low-income economies (those with a Gross national income (GNI) per capita under US$1,006) covered by the Index, Rwanda is the only country which scored above 60%.(Page 16)
  • Rwanda’s highest performance was seen in the “deployment subindex” where it ranked second globally with a score of 90.1%. Within this subindex, the report assessed four indicators which include: Labour force participation rate, employment gender gap, unemployment rate and underemployment rate.
  • Rwanda performed poorly in the “capacity subindex” which involved four indicators: Literacy and numeracy, primary education attainment rate, secondary education attainment rate and tertiary education attainment rate. It scored 47.9% and ranked 112.
The general overview: 
  • On average, the world has developed only 62% of
    its human capital as measured by this Index. Or,
    conversely, nations are neglecting or wasting, on
    average, 38% of their talent.
  • The top ten of this year’s edition of the Human Capital Index is headed by smaller European countries— Norway (1), Finland (2), Switzerland (3)—as well as large economies such as the United States (4) and Germany (6).
  • Across the Index, there are
    only 25 nations that have tapped 70% of their people’s
    human capital or more. In addition, 50 countries score
    between 60% and 70%. A further 41 countries score
    between 50% and 60%, while 14 countries remain
    below 50%, meaning these nations are currently
    leveraging less than half of their human capital.
  • The leaders of the Index are generally economies with a longstanding commitment to their people’s educational attainment and that have deployed a broad share of their workforce in skill-intensive occupations across a broad range of sectors.
  • At a regional level, the human capital development gap is smallest in North America and largest in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.
The full report (PDF) is available here

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